Species Action: Agapanthia villosoviridescens

Agapanthia villosoviridescens

 

Something to look out for!

Only recorded a handful of times in St Helens in 2013 and 2014 this beetle is very much to the North of it's range. It may well be moving Northwards in response to climate pressures but also requires sensitive management of grasslands. In particular Hogweeds and Cow Parsely. This is certainly one to look out for with it's flight period given as May to June (though possibly, year round).

This species is found mainly in moist meadows and hedgerows where adults feed mainly on umbellifers such as Heracleum sphondylium (Hogweed) and Anthriscus sylvestris (Cow Parsley). It is also found on nettles and thistles.

Their flight time is May to August but numbers peak in May and June. It is a stem boring species who’s larvae develop in the stalks of the host plant, working their way down while growing, eventually cutting off the stalk and creating pupal cells near to ground level. Adults emerge through a newly cut exit hole in the side of the stalk.

It is a large a very distinctive longhorn beetle, reaching a length of 10-22 millimetres. It has a golden, iridescent bloom on the elytra and thorax and the antennae are also very distinctive having dark and light bands.

If you think you have found this beetle then please let us know. Help us track it's progress or see if the species action plan has had any effect almost 5 years on!

The account and action from St Helens council can be found here.