Botany

Jim Pearson: The Purple Fumitory

Fumaria purpurea (Dr Phil Smith)

Purple Ramping-fumitory is a nationally scarce and endemic to the UK, the only place it grows naturally in the world. It is an annual plant which used to be widespread in the mixed farming and arable areas of Britain. However, during the last 50 years it has undergone a drastic decline throughout its former range largely  due to modern farming methods such as the move to autumn sown cropping and  the introduction of broad-spectrum herbicides which threaten its continued existence. It has also declined in areas where there has been high arable reversion to grassland

Rob Duffy: Sidewalk Botany Report January-March 2018

Mistletoe, West Derby (Rob Duffy)

 

The year kicked off with the New Year Survey of flowering plants of the Liverpool Loop Line, which didn’t yield much, but what was quite inspiring on a cold, wet, afternoon, to this relative fern novice, was the abundance of Soft Shield Fern shuttlecocks (Polystichum setiferum), in the Broad Green “dell”.  I posted a photo of these on the “Friends of Liverpool Loopline” facebook page, hoping the cyclists and litter picking team would wax enthusiastic.

Hugh Harris: Introduction to Grasses

Museum Meadow (Hugh Harris)

The aims of the workshop were to develop skills in identifying British native grass species, recognise the most widely occurring grasses and to familiarise ourselves with reference book keys and herbarium specimens.

Peter Gateley, local Ecologist recommended at least 2 guides for starters in grass identification:

  • FSC “Guide to Common Grasses”
  • C.E. Hubbard, “Grasses”, Third Edition, 1984 Penguin Books

We started with naming of parts of live specimens and photographs which are diagnostic in identifying the grass; Inflorescence (flower head), florets, awns, spikelets, ligules, leaves and growth forms

Introducing Ferns

At World Museum, William Brown Street, Liverpool L3 8EN

Attendance free but booking is essential

For further information and booking please use contact details provided. 

Using natural science collections to connect with the environment and promote biological recording.

 

Familiarise yourself with ferns. Learn how to recognise some common species, using fresh material and museum specimens.

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