Vascular plants

Rob Duffy: Sidewalk Botanist-June Notes

(Rob Duffy)

The “scrapes” in Court Hey Park are as dry as a bone and can be traversed to inspect the wetland flora-the flora of the pavement cracks too has altered completely under the unrelenting Sun but, with the disappearance of the widespread Thale Cress, many species, particularly Willowherbs, are surviving. Perhaps this is the time to get to grips with this common garden weed? Identification is not too difficult, depending on the shape of the stigma, whether there are ridges on the stem, the length of the petiole, or the length of the leaves and pods, to name but a few features. But, beware of hybridisation!

Rob Duffy: Sidewalk Botanist gets close and personal with a saxifrage and illustrates the tribulations of using

I borrowed BioBank’s copy of “Poland” to try and resolve the mystery of its identity from a
fragment I had taken - comprising fully intact leaves- and found myself keying out Saxifraga
umbrosa (Pyrenean saxifrage) , or Saxifrage nivalis (Alpine saxifrage). I was really attracted to the
latter because “Poland” refers to “the long wavy cilia near the base” (of the petiole).

Jim Pearson: The Purple Fumitory

Fumaria purpurea (Dr Phil Smith)

Purple Ramping-fumitory is a nationally scarce and endemic to the UK, the only place it grows naturally in the world. It is an annual plant which used to be widespread in the mixed farming and arable areas of Britain. However, during the last 50 years it has undergone a drastic decline throughout its former range largely  due to modern farming methods such as the move to autumn sown cropping and  the introduction of broad-spectrum herbicides which threaten its continued existence. It has also declined in areas where there has been high arable reversion to grassland

Liverpool Botanical Society

 

Founded in 1906, the Society runs a programme of events, indoor meetings at the World Museum Liverpool during the winter months and field meetings around the region during spring, summer and autumn.
The early years of the Society were documented in the Proceedings of the Liverpool Botanical Society, then in a Bulletin and the Society now produces a newsletter Parnassia with news and reports of indoor and field meetings.


​The Library of the Society, also founded in 1906, is located in the Botany Department W in the Museum.

New taxon for Crosby Coastal Park

Notes on Oenothera hybrid (Phil Smith)

A small-flowered Evenint-primrose from a population found at Crosby Coastal Park was collected and sent to Rosemary Murphy, the national referee for Oenothera, earlier this year. Rosemary has now carried out a detailed examination of the plant material and has concluded that it is most likely the 'triple hybrid' Oenothera glazioviana x O. biennis x O.cambrica an identification which had previously been suspected.

Hugh Harris: Mine Waste Cronton SJ471891

Bee Orchid (Hugh Harris)

 

MINE WASTE LWS, CRONTON. KNOWSLEY.      SJ471891 (Sat Nav. WA8 5QN)

Sat 11 June 2016.   Leader: Dave Earl

Weather: 17°C. Mostly cloudy, scattered showers with a warm high of 21° Data from Foreca

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