Hugh Harris: Springtime at Martin Mere

By nottsexminer (Brimstone Butterfly  Uploaded by Fæ) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)].

 

There was a feeling of spring in the air as we walked the Millers Bridge Trail lined with Daffodils, Primroses, Lesser Celandine and Common Dog Violet. The Willow’s bright green leaves were appearing above the Flamingo Pen as we proceeded to the Ron Barker Hide. Temperatures were around 11°C with clear blue skies and aircraft contrail clouds; no rain but light gusts of wind. Pheasants, Woodpigeon and Blackbirds moved about the Screen banks and trees. Brimstones and Tortoiseshells fluttered around the Hides and stoats scurried across the tracks: a different experience to a chilly winter’s day in January.

Wetland birdwatching in the company of fellow WeBS counters at Martin Mere in good weather is a satisfying spectacle.

The Ron Barker Hide overlooks the wildest part of Martin Mere and provides superb views, especially in winter. The WWT controls artificially the water levels by means of channels and sluices.

Pheasant

Phasianus colchicus

Wigeon

Anas penelope

Shelduck

Tadorna tadorna

Teal

Anas crecca

Black-headed Gull

Larus ridibundus

Moorhen

Gallinula chloropus

Greylag

Anser anser

Mallard

Anas platyrhynchos

Canada Goose

Branta canadensis

Shoveler

Anas clypeata

Lapwing

Vanellus vanellus

Pied Wagtail

Motacilla alba

Avocet

Recurviostra avosetta

Cormorant

Phalacrocorax carba

Oystercatcher

Haematopus ostralegus

Buzzard

Buteo buteo

Coot

Fulica atra

Little Egret

Egretta garzetta

Whooper Swan

Cygnus cygnus

Grey Heron

Ardea cinerea

 

Retracing our steps, we stopped at the John Raines Hide which overlooks the Mere and here we added the following birds to our list: Mediterranean gulls Larus melanocephalus, Pintail Anas acuta and Bar-tailed Godwit Limosa lapponica.

Wetland birdwatching in the company of fellow WeBS counters at Martin Mere in good weather is a satisfying spectacle.

HH@BTO