• In order to protect our local wildlife we need to be able to understand how it uses the landscape and green spaces. We need your help to do this.

  • Urban Local Wildlife Sites (LWS) are essential to protecting and conserving the wildlife of Merseyside. Requests for information on North Merseyside LWS are free of charge.

  • The Slender groundhopper (Tetrix subulata) is now thought to be a permenant resident and could be expanding its range..

  • North Merseyside is home to an amazing combination of wildlife and wildplaces. From the internationally recognised Sefton Coast to the urban parks of Liverpool.

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Volunteer

Everything we do is only possible through the support and input of an extensive network of volunteers throughout Merseyside and beyond. We need volunteers in the field and in the office, be it working directly with us, independently or via your own local groups. We need your help.

Dr Phil Smith: Wildlife Notes April 2018

Natterjack Toad (Dr Phil Smith)

April 2018 really broke the mould. Since the millennium, we have got used to prolonged droughts, with April showers a distant memory. This month, measurable rain fell on 12 days and, although it was mainly colder than average, there was a heatwave from 18th to 21st with the highest April temperatures (in London) since 1949. Remarkably, the dune water-table actually rose by 4.5cm during the month. The result was the best Natterjack Toad activity for several years. For the first time, these rare amphibians spawned in the youngest section of the Green Beach at Ainsdale. Although usually nocturnal, some amorous male Natterjacks started calling during the afternoon of 9th and I found three pairs as well as ten Smooth Newts, while Skylarks were singing their hearts out overhead and 18 migratory White Wagtails foraged on the shore.

Rob Duffy: Sidewalk Botanist - Early Spring Notes

Chickweed in flower (Rob Duffy)

Last Saturday, the 14th, was the warmest day (at 14 degrees celcius) in nearly 5 months and an excursion across the Roby fields and ponds was a positive pleasure. Beyond the M62 bridge, a huge field of young winter wheat covers a kilometre in length and somewhat less in width; within it a series of ponds are enclosed by hawthorn hedges, ditches run with clear water and here and there are alder and willow “carr”.

Hugh Harris: Lunt Meadows and Wetlands Nature Reserve, SD3402

Water vole (Peter Trimming)

Lunt Meadows is an entirely new 77 ha wetland nature reserve, located along the River Alt floodplain, owned by the Environment Agency, in North Merseyside. It is sited adjacent to an area of raised bank suspected to be the first point of overtopping in a flood event. In July 2010 the River Alt bank did breach in this location and an area of 80 ha was inundated to a maximum depth of 1m. Developing habitats include wet grassland, reedbed, fen and open water. The site is managed primarily for breeding waders and water vole.

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