• To help us understand, monitor and conserve wildlife we occasionally run recording projects ourselves or with partners. Help us by getting involved.

  • In order to protect our local wildlife we need to be able to understand how it uses the landscape and green spaces. We need your help to do this.

  • Recording wildlife helps to inform future plans and City Region development. Highlighting areas for existing wildlife and opportunities for new connected habitat. See the LCR Ecological Network: http://www.lcreconet.uk
  • Urban Local Wildlife Sites (LWS) are essential to protecting and conserving the wildlife of Merseyside. Requests for information on North Merseyside LWS are free of charge.

  • Dragonflies and Damselflies are considered local priority species in North Merseyside as part of the NMBAP. Such Species and Habitats have conservation action plans which can be found here www.merseysidebiodiversity.org.uk
  • The Slender groundhopper (Tetrix subulata) is now thought to be a permenant resident and could be expanding its range. Your wildlife sightings can help us monitor changes in species distribution.

  • North Merseyside is home to an amazing combination of wildlife and wildplaces. From the internationally recognised Sefton Coast to the urban parks of Liverpool.

Privacy Policy

Please read our updated Privacy Policy.

This policy has been updated in-line with the new General Data Protection Regulation drawing on advice from the Information Commissioners Office and Association of Local Environmental Records Centres. The policy affects your rights and adds transparency to how your personal information is held and managed. If you have any questions in regards to the new Regulations or your Rights then please do get in touch.

We will continue to review and update our policies and data management documentation inline with this new policy.

Volunteer

Volunteer

Everything we do is only possible through the support and input of an extensive network of volunteers throughout Merseyside and beyond. We need volunteers in the field and in the office, be it working directly with us, independently or via your own local groups. We need your help.

Species Action: Agapanthia villosoviridescens

Agapanthia villosoviridescens

 

Something to look out for!

Only recorded a handful of times in St Helens in 2013 and 2014 this beetle is very much to the North of it's range. It may well be moving Northwards in response to climate pressures but also requires sensitive management of grasslands. In particular Hogweeds and Cow Parsely. This is certainly one to look out for with it's flight period given as May to June (though possibly, year round).

Dr Phil Smith: Wildlife Notes May 2018

Large Red Damselflies (Dr Phil Smith)

The Met. Office reckoned it was the warmest and sunniest May on record; it was also dry with measurable rainfall on only eight days. Forecasts of torrential thunder-storms came day after day during the last week but all we got were a couple of brief showers on 30th and 31st. The duneland water-table therefore fell rapidly, the Newest Green Beach at Ainsdale with 1000+ small Natterjack tadpoles on 2nd having completely dried up by 13th. Fortunately, tadpoles at several other sites, including the Devil’s Hole, survived until at least the end of the month.

Odonata in North Merseyside

Calyopteryx virgo, Cumbria (Ben Deed)

The Beautiful Demoiselle, Calopteryx virgo, is a Damselfly native to the UK and occurs in Cheshire and Cumbria. However, there are currently no verified records of this species for North Merseyside (see The LCFS 'The Dragonflies of Lancashire and North Merseyside', 2015 for further info).

All Odonata (Dragonflies and Damselflies) are considered local conservation priority species particular where there are locally significant breeding sites.

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