• To help us understand, monitor and conserve wildlife we occasionally run recording projects ourselves or with partners. Help us by getting involved.

  • In order to protect our local wildlife we need to be able to understand how it uses the landscape and green spaces. We need your help to do this.

  • Recording wildlife helps to inform future plans and City Region development. Highlighting areas for existing wildlife and opportunities for new connected habitat. See the LCR Ecological Network: http://www.lcreconet.uk
  • Urban Local Wildlife Sites (LWS) are essential to protecting and conserving the wildlife of Merseyside. Requests for information on North Merseyside LWS are free of charge.

  • Dragonflies and Damselflies are considered local priority species in North Merseyside as part of the NMBAP. Such Species and Habitats have conservation action plans which can be found here www.merseysidebiodiversity.org.uk
  • The Slender groundhopper (Tetrix subulata) is now thought to be a permenant resident and could be expanding its range. Your wildlife sightings can help us monitor changes in species distribution.

  • North Merseyside is home to an amazing combination of wildlife and wildplaces. From the internationally recognised Sefton Coast to the urban parks of Liverpool.

Privacy Policy

Please read our updated Privacy Policy.

This policy has been updated in-line with the new General Data Protection Regulation drawing on advice from the Information Commissioners Office and Association of Local Environmental Records Centres. The policy affects your rights and adds transparency to how your personal information is held and managed. If you have any questions in regards to the new Regulations or your Rights then please do get in touch.

We will continue to review and update our policies and data management documentation inline with this new policy.

Volunteer

Volunteer

Everything we do is only possible through the support and input of an extensive network of volunteers throughout Merseyside and beyond. We need volunteers in the field and in the office, be it working directly with us, independently or via your own local groups. We need your help.

Dr Phil Smith: Wildlife Notes August 2018

Bishop's Mitre (Dr Phil Smith)

In this driest and hottest summer since 1976, the blessed relief of at least some rain on 12 August days helped to temper the worst effects. However, the damage and costs to the country became increasingly evident, with agriculture reporting production losses of 50% or more. Not to worry, rather than celebrating desperately needed rainfall, the TV weather presenters described the only really wet day during the month (26th) as “Soggy Sunday”!

Freshfield Dune Heath: Rhacognathus punctatus

Rhacognathus punctatus (Dr Phil Smith)

Another interesting discovery at Freshfield by Dr Phil Smith. This Shieldbug (Rhacognathus punctatus the Heather Shieldbug) is otherwise unknown from locations in South Lancashire (VC59). As a whole there are only 200 records for the UK (NBN Atlas 09.08.2018).

The only other records for our area are from Coastal Surveys carried out by the natural history staff at the World Museum Liverpool. This survey produced 4 records of this species. All of them from locations within the same nature reserve and all collected on the 15th July 1997.

Dr Phil Smith: Wildlife Notes July 2018

Coastal fire damage (Dr Phil Smith)

With the countryside in flames, farmers losing millions and the water-supply industry in turmoil, the TV weather presenters finally acknowledged the longest summer drought since 1976 and started to talk about the “chance” of showers, rather than the “risk”! We actually had six days with measurable rain during July but only on 29th was there enough to make a difference to the parched landscape. A spate of fires along the coast seemed inevitable. The biggest at Hightown dunes, Altcar Training Camp and Ainsdale Sand Dunes National Nature Reserve each destroyed several hectares, while several smaller blazes were also reported. Further afield, about a third of Lytham St. Anne’s Local Nature Reserve went up in flames. These fires can kill small mammals, reptiles and invertebrates but most plants usually recover quite quickly. Thus, after three weeks, the Hightown fire site was already showing regrowth of vegetation.

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