• In order to protect our local wildlife we need to be able to understand how it uses the landscape and green spaces. We need your help to do this.

  • Urban Local Wildlife Sites (LWS) are essential to protecting and conserving the wildlife of Merseyside. Requests for information on North Merseyside LWS are free of charge.

  • The Slender groundhopper (Tetrix subulata) is now thought to be a permenant resident and could be expanding its range..

  • North Merseyside is home to an amazing combination of wildlife and wildplaces. From the internationally recognised Sefton Coast to the urban parks of Liverpool.

Merseyside BioBank (MBB) is the Local Records Centre (LRC) for North Merseyside. We collect and collate biological and environmental information and make it available to people interested in learning more about their local environment. We promote the North Merseyside Biodiversity Action Plan and wider participation in conservation through education, community involvement and by supporting the biological recording community of North Merseyside. You can help us to protect wildlife in our area by sending in your records.

Find out more about Merseyside BioBank.

Dr Phil Smith: Wildlife Notes July 2016

Frog (Phil Smith)

Apart from a one-day heatwave on 19th when temperatures reached an oppressive 32oC, the month’s weather was unexceptional. Rainfall seems to have been about average but it was often cooler than expected in the first two and the last weeks. Predictably, the Devil’s Hole slack gradually dried up, though there was still a little surface water in the deepest parts (see below).

Dr Phil Smith: Wildlife Notes June 2016

Dark green fritillary (Phil Smith)

Although June was wetter than normal in most parts of the country, this was not the case here. The first rain did not fall until 10th and we missed most of the thundery downpours that caused flooding further south and east. Nevertheless, a few heavy showers and more unsettled conditions later in the month maintained enough surface-water in sand-dune wetlands for our Natterjack Toads to breed successfully in several places.

Garden BioBlitz Results: June 2016

The Results

This year’s national Garden BioBlitz was held over the weekend of the 4-5 June.  Supported by Springwatch and the BBC’s Do Something Great campaign, scores of enthusiastic naturalists braved unpredictable weather to see what else called their gardens home.  Four week on, and we’re ready to announce the results.

A grand total of 1,292 species were spotted, plus a couple of hundred at genus or family level.  In total 93 people submitted a whopping 6,007 records, of which 5,389 were identified to species. 

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