• In order to protect our local wildlife we need to be able to understand how it uses the landscape and green spaces. We need your help to do this.

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  • The Slender groundhopper (Tetrix subulata) is now thought to be a permenant resident and could be expanding its range..

  • North Merseyside is home to an amazing combination of wildlife and wildplaces. From the internationally recognised Sefton Coast to the urban parks of Liverpool.

Dr Phil Smith: Wildlife Notes January 2018

Pink-foot Goose (Dr Phil Smith)

With 18 rain-days and the two named storms Eleanor and Georgina, January was wetter than average. This meant a welcome recovery in the dune water-table which returned to “normal” winter levels. I measured a rise of about 17cm at the Devil’s Hole blowout during the month, resulting in extensive flooding of the lower sections. This is good news for the Natterjack Toad which might have somewhere to breed in the spring.

Big tides and high winds early in the month created a storm surge which, although not as strong as those in the 2013/14 winter, produced some erosion at Formby Point and Hightown. I estimated a 5m loss of dunes at Hightown, impacting important populations of Isle of Man Cabbage and the rare Triple-hybrid Evening Primrose. In contrast, there were minimal effects at the Ainsdale end of Birkdale Green Beach, where the much wider shore absorbs the energy of the waves.

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