• To help us understand, monitor and conserve wildlife we occasionally run recording projects ourselves or with partners. Help us by getting involved.

  • In order to protect our local wildlife we need to be able to understand how it uses the landscape and green spaces. We need your help to do this.

  • Recording wildlife helps to inform future plans and City Region development. Highlighting areas for existing wildlife and opportunities for new connected habitat. See the LCR Ecological Network: http://www.lcreconet.uk
  • Urban Local Wildlife Sites (LWS) are essential to protecting and conserving the wildlife of Merseyside. Requests for information on North Merseyside LWS are free of charge.

  • Dragonflies and Damselflies are considered local priority species in North Merseyside as part of the NMBAP. Such Species and Habitats have conservation action plans which can be found here www.merseysidebiodiversity.org.uk
  • The Slender groundhopper (Tetrix subulata) is now thought to be a permenant resident and could be expanding its range. Your wildlife sightings can help us monitor changes in species distribution.

  • North Merseyside is home to an amazing combination of wildlife and wildplaces. From the internationally recognised Sefton Coast to the urban parks of Liverpool.

Privacy Policy

Please read our updated Privacy Policy.

This policy has been updated in-line with the new General Data Protection Regulation drawing on advice from the Information Commissioners Office and Association of Local Environmental Records Centres. The policy affects your rights and adds transparency to how your personal information is held and managed. If you have any questions in regards to the new Regulations or your Rights then please do get in touch.

We will continue to review and update our policies and data management documentation inline with this new policy.

Volunteer

Volunteer

Everything we do is only possible through the support and input of an extensive network of volunteers throughout Merseyside and beyond. We need volunteers in the field and in the office, be it working directly with us, independently or via your own local groups. We need your help.

The Harlequin Ladybird

Harlequin Ladybird form spectabilis (Ben Deed)

The story of the Harlequin is one of good intentions but poor delivery. Brought to the UK as a voracious hunter of 'pest species' in greenhouses the Harlequin was introduced as a means of effective #biological control to minimise the use of pesticides. Great! However, apparently poor forethought or containment meant it didn't take long before this species escaped into the wild.

BTO: Garden watchers help to lift the lid on leg disease found in British birds

Chaffinch at feeder (Luke Delve)

Observations collected by citizen scientists have helped vets at the international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) investigate the occurrence of a condition that affects British finches. The latest study published in Scientific Reports shows that reports of leg lesions peak in winter, from March to November, which may be linked to the annual influx of migratory Chaffinches from mainland Europe.

Dr Phil Smith: Wildlife Notes September 2018

Yucca (Dr Phil Smith)

September was another relatively dry month. Although measurable rain fell on 12 days, there were significant amounts on only three dates. As a result, the sand-dune water-table at my Devil’s Hole measuring point continued to fall when it would usually be starting to re-charge. I had a letter published in the Radio Times pointing out that TV weather presenters are supposed to be educated people and should be aware that this country is only habitable because of regular reliable rainfall. Perhaps, therefore, they should stop perpetuating the myth that rain is bad. Evidently, they didn’t read it!

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